Radon is a cancer-causing radioactive gas. You cannot see, smell or taste radon, but it may be a problem in your home. The Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today.  Some scientific studies of radon exposure indicate that children may be more sensitive to radon. This may be due to their higher respiration rate and their rapidly dividing cells, which may be more vulnerable to radiation damage.

         Radon forms naturally from the decay of radioactive elements, such as uranium, which are found at different levels in soil and rock throughout the world. Radon gas in the soil and rock can move into the air and into ground water and surface water.Radon is a national environmental health problem. Elevated radon levels have been discovered in every state. The US EPA estimates that as many as 8 million homes throughout the country have elevated levels of radon. The EPA reccomends radon levels to be less than 4 pCi/l.

         Testing is the only way to know your home's radon levels. There are no immediate symptoms that will alert you to the presence of radon. It typically takes years of exposure before any problems surface. If your home has high concentrations of radon there are ways to reduce it to acceptable levels.

 

Here are some great resources for radon:

http://www.epa.gov/radon/aboutus.html

http://www.epa.gov/radon/states/washington.html

http://www.epa.gov/radon/zonemap.html#mapcolors

http://iaq.supportportal.com/link/portal/23002/23007/ArticleFolder/976/Radon

 

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